Amboseli National Park

Inside Amboseli National Park Kenya, Safaris in Amboseli

Amboseli National Park was formally known as Maasai Amboseli Game Reserve. The Amboseli National Park is located in the southern part of Kenya in Kajiado South Constituency in Kajiado County.  Amboseli was set aside as the Southern Reserve for the Maasai in 1906 but returned to local control as a game reserve in 1948. Gazetted a national park in 1974 to protect the core of this unique ecosystem, it was declared a UNESCO site in 1991.

Amboseli National Park stretches on a total land area of 392 square kilometers and forms the unfenced core of an 8,000 km2 ecosystem that includes large tracts of Maasai community land both in Kenya and across the border in Tanzania. Amboseli lies at the northern base of Kilimanjaro and, clouds permitting, it offers tremendous opportunity to photograph plains wildlife below the snow-capped peak of Africa’s tallest mountain.

The local people are mainly Maasai, but people from other parts of the country have in recent years settled there, attracted by the successful tourist-driven economy and intensive agriculture along the system of swamps that makes this low-rainfall area, average 350 mm (14 in), one of the best wildlife-viewing experiences in the world with 400 species of birds including water birds like pelicans, kingfishers, crakes, hamerkop and 47 raptor species and lot more.

Amboseli National Park is the second most popular National Park in Kenya after the premier Masai Mara Reserve.  The National Park is a great place to visit for wildlife sightings all year round due to the remarkable numbers of wildlife found here.

Amboseli National Park Wildlife
Amboseli National Park - Kenya

Wildlife and Attractions in Amboseli National Park

Amboseli National Park is famous for being the best place in the world, where you can possibly get close to free-ranging elephants that roam in the National Park, and many have described it as ‘Africa’s  Elephant Park’. Aside from this, there are 56 known animal species in the park, and you are likely to see Gravy’s and Burch ell’s zebra, white-bearded wildebeest, eland, buffalo, hartebeest, hippo, giraffe, wild dog, waterbuck, jackal, Thomson’s and Grant’s gazelle and impala. And if you are lucky enough you may also come across big cats such as lions and cheetah, as well as hyenas. The other top attractions of the park include opportunities to meet Maasai and visit a Maasai village, where you can interact with the local Maasai People and perhaps participate in the community activities.

The Amboseli National Park also offers a great view of Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest free-standing mountain in the world and the highest mountain in Africa. Beneath the park, there is an infinite water supply continuously providing for the park through two natural springs.

The National Park was a great home of Echo, perhaps the most researched elephant in the world, and the subject of many documentaries and books. The research was followed by an American conservationist Dr. Cynthia Moss for almost four decades until she (Echo) died in 2009 when she was about 60 years old.

Amboseli National Park hippos fighting
Amboseli National Park safari

What is Amboseli Known for?

The National Park is famous for habituating large herds of elephants, the elephants live in families and can be spotted all over the Park. Amboseli also offers dramatic views of Kilimanjaro, the highest free-standing mountain in the world and the highest peak on the African continent.

Is Amboseli worth visiting?

In our opinion, Amboseli National Park is worth Visiting. Despite having some of the same attractions as some of the other popular national parks in Kenya, a safari to Amboseli is really unique with a unique experience. The great diversity makes Amboseli a National Park in Kenya that is absolutely worth visiting.

Facts about Amboseli National Park

Located in Loitoktok District within the Rift Valley, Entonet, Kenya. Amboseli was set aside as the Southern Reserve for the Maasai in 1906 but returned to local control as a game reserve in 1948. Gazetted a national park in 1974 to protect the core of this unique ecosystem, it was declared a UNESCO site in 1991. Stretches on a total area of 392km2, managed by Kenya Wildlife Service.

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