Top 10 Facts about African Wild Dogs (African Hunting Dogs)

The top 10 facts about African wild dogs, also called the African painted dogs and the African hunting dogs is a wild canine that is a native species to sub-Saharan Africa.

African Hunting Dogs: African Wild Dogs Facts

A dog is a dog: The Cape hunting dog and painted dog are other names for the African wild dog. No two dogs have identical markings on their coat, much like each zebra has a distinct stripe pattern and each person has a fingerprint. Fur is spotted with bright patches of red, black, brown, white, and yellow, creating an eye-catching look that is also necessary for survival.

African Hunting Dog

African Hunting Dog

Play it by ear: The huge, rounded ears of African wild canines swivel like satellite dishes to pick up faint sounds in the distance.

More is less: They only have four toes per foot, which is another way that African wild dogs vary from domestic dogs.

The fastest will survive: Wild dogs are capable of sprinting up to 44 mph in pursuit of prey.

African wild dogs have a pack mentality; they truly live and die for their family. Although the efficiency of the hunt increases with the size of the clan, non-breeding adults give up their own nutrition to make sure the pups in the group have enough to eat and thrive. These kinds of elders consequently have a propensity to gradually lose weight and pass away earlier than their contemporaries in packs with fewer young.

Top dogs: Wild dogs are among Africa’s most successful predators, with an astounding success rate of 80%. In just about 30% of cases lions win.

Not quite the best friend of a man: African wild dogs are among the most endangered creatures in the world, even though they have highly developed hunting abilities. Only 6,600 wild dogs are still alive, predominantly in Tanzania, northern Mozambique, and southern Africa, according to the IUCN Red List. The largest dangers to the species are caused by their increased interaction with people, including habitat loss, villagers’ desire for vengeance for livestock killed, and viral infections obtained from domestic dogs.

In the broad plains and scant woodlands of sub-Saharan Africa, African wild dogs spend their days patrolling vast tracts of land, with home ranges of up to several hundred square miles. Take a look at this comparison: 8.8 million people live in Greater London, but only one or two packs of African wild dogs could live there.

A monogamous pair of alpha dogs heads each pack, and the entire posse takes turns taking care of each litter of puppies, from watching over them and nursing them to regurgitating meat after a hunt.

No dog is ever left behind: African wild dogs hunt antelopes and even larger prey like wildebeests in bands of six to twenty or more. These extremely gregarious animals interact with one another through touch, movement, and vocalizations. Before a hunt, you can observe them jokingly surrounding one another and appearing to psyche one another up for the activity. The elderly, ill, and handicapped members of the pack receive care from them, making them one of the few animals to do so.

African wild dogs or African Hunting Dogs are among the continent’s rarest wildlife sightings; travelers have a relatively high chance of spotting these captivating canines in the wildlife parks of South Africa, Tanzania, and Botswana, to name a few.

African Hunting Dogs Facts:

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

SIZE: ABOUT 1 METER IN LENGTH (30 TO 43 INCHES)

DIET: CARNIVOROUS

SCIENTIFIC NAME: LYCAON PICTUS

LIFE SPAN: 10 TO 12 YEARS

GESTATION: ABOUT 70 DAYS

WEIGHT: 18 TO 36 KILOGRAMS (40 TO 79 POUNDS)

HABITAT: DENSE FOREST TO OPEN PLAINS

PREDATORS: HUMANS AND OCCASIONALLY LIONS

LET'S START PLANNING
× Help Me Plan
Pay online